Kylie Jenner may have only been on Forbes’ Billionaires List for two years — after an investigation found the now 25-year-old is merely worth $900 million — but there are plenty of other youngin’s who are billionaires.

In fact, even if had Jenner remained on the list, she would have been dethroned as the world’s youngest billionaire by a 19-year-old drugstore scion.

From Oslo, Norway, to Orlando, Fla., these are the world’s seven youngest billionaires.

Gustav Magnar Witzøe, 29

Worth: $4.2 billion

After inheriting his father's stake in the family salmon farming business, Gustav Magnar Witzøe is one of the world's youngest billionaires with a net worth of more than $4 billion.
After inheriting his father’s stake in the family salmon farming business, Gustav Magnar Witzøe is one of the world’s youngest billionaires with a net worth of more than $4 billion.
Gustav Magnar Witzøe

Norwegian model Gustav Magnar Witzøe been blessed with good looks — and $4.2 billion.

His father, also named Gustav, founded one of the world’s largest salmon producers, Salmar ASA, in 1991 and gifted his stake to his only child 22 years later. The model, who became a billionaire at 18, now lives with his Staffordshire bull terrier, Aro, in an Oslo penthouse overlooking the Aker Brygge waterfront.

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Witzøe told The Telegraph, ‘I wasn’t poorer or richer the day after [he inherited the stake]. It’s still my dad’s company, he makes that decision. It’s paperwork, basically. It’s not like the money instantly transfers to your bank account.”

Witzøe taking his father's vintage Aston Martin for a spin in his native Frøya, a small island in Norway.
Witzøe, who taking his father’s vintage Aston Martin for a spin in his native Frøya, a small island in Norway.
@guswitzoe/Instagram

Still, the 29-year-old lives a glamorous life, cruising around in a $160,000 Lamborghini Urus.

Though Witzøe doesn’t necessarily need to work, he keeps himself busy with three jobs: modeling, investing in start-ups through a firm he co-runs, Wiski Capital, and operating his philanthropic The W Initiative, which donates to groups focused on children’s health and education.

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Though Witzøe doesn't have any human roommates, he shares his penthouse in Oslo with his Staffordshire bull terrier, Aro.
Though Witzøe doesn’t have any human roommates, he shares his penthouse in Oslo with his Staffordshire bull terrier, Aro.
@guswitzoe/Instagram

After high school, he even worked on the salmon farm for two years.

“It was a really great experience, it’s so nice to work outside all day, using your body. You get home and you’re exhausted. I learnt a lot about the industry and how things worked,” he told The Telegraph.

Ryan Breslow, 28

Worth: $2 billion

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Ryan Breslow, the Miami-based founder of tech startup Bolt, said he lives like a monk.
Ryan Breslow, the Miami-based founder of tech startup Bolt, said he lives like a monk.
Getty Images for Wharton School’

Like several other billionaires on this list, Ryan Breslow dropped out of college — leaving Stanford, in his case, to focus on Bolt, the payment startup he founded his sophomore year. The software brings one-click payments to online retailers, simplifying the landscape of e-commerce companies so much that Bolt is now valued at $11 billion. Breslow’s own net worth? A whopping $2 billion.

Though Breslow is one of the world’s youngest billionaires, he doesn’t exactly live like one in his relatively modest three-bedroom home on the border of Miami’s Little Haiti neighborhood, not far from where he grew up in North Miami Beach.

During his childhood, both of Breslow’s grandfathers joined forces to run a denim shop, an accounting firm and a seafood market, and his parents owned a local golf range. An entrepreneurial spirit certainly runs in the family, but Breslow doesn’t make a big fuss about his success — especially on Instagram, where his posts are strictly business.

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />The entrepreneur said he wants "nothing to do with the elite billionaire lifestyle.
The entrepreneur said he wants “nothing to do with the elite billionaire lifestyle.
BOLT.COM

According to Forbes, “Breslow spends most days alone at home. He dances to ‘house disco’ music on the AstroTurf in his backyard. He meditates amid soaring palm trees, white Buddha statues and a humming air conditioner. And, from a treadmill desk in his sunroom, near the ceremonial drums, he runs Bolt.” In the same article, Breslow, who lives on a vegan diet, said, “I live a monk lifestyle.” He avoids gluten, alcohol and caffeine.

“Most people who get rich want to be a part of an elite circle. I want nothing to do with it — I’m probably one of the only billionaires who has that feeling,” Breslow, who relies only on candlelight after sunset so as not to disrupt his sleep cycle, has said.

In early 2022, he instituted a four-day workweek for his 800 Bolt employees, saying, “There’s too much work theater, where people go through the motions to appear busy. I’d much rather have you focus on your health, well-being and family during your time off, so that when you’re here working, you’re all in.”

Pedro Franceschi and Henrique Dubugras, both 26

Worth: $1.5 billion each

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />The Brazilian co-founders of payment-focused startup Brex, Pedro Franceschi (left) and Henrique Dubugras (right), are both now billionaires.
The Brazilian co-founders of payment-focused startup Brex, Pedro Franceschi (left) and Henrique Dubugras (right), are both now billionaires.
BREX

With a net worth of $1.5 billion each, Brazilians Henrique Dubugras and Pedro Franceschi, who started coding when they were pre-teens, earned their spot on Forbes’ list in January 2022, five years after co-founding the fintech startup Brex. Their company revolutionized spending for small businesses, allowing early-stage organizations to use a corporate credit card, a privilege most young startups are denied.

The pair met when they were still in high school — Dubugras in Sao Paulo and Franceschi in Rio de Janeiro. In a 2020 interview with The Takeoff, Dubugras said, “We met at the end of 2012 over Twitter, fighting [about] Vim vs. Emacs [two text editors for programming] … It got complicated to fight over 140 characters, so we went to Skype and became best friends there.”

Franceschi wasn’t the only person Dubugras fought with, though. In the same interview, Dubugras said, “I was having fights with my mom, moved out of my house, got emancipated, and was running out of money.” Rather than get a job to support himself, he and two coder friends — not including Franceschi — traveled to Miami for a hackathon competition with a $50,000 prize and won.

” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />In 2019, Dubugras spoke at the annual Bridge Forum conference, which introduces tech and finance leaders in Asia to those in San Francisco.
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